240 Words to Describe Someone’s Tone/Voice

smut-101:

  1. Abrasive – showing little concern for the feelings of others; harsh
  2. Absurd – wildly unreasonable, illogical, or inappropriate
  3. Accusatory – suggesting someone has done something wrong, complaining
  4. Acerbic – sharp and forthright
  5. Acidic – harsh or critical
  6. Admiring – approving; think highly of; respectful; praising
  7. Aggressive – hostile; determined; forceful; argumentative
  8. Aggrieved –  angry and sad because you think you have been unfairly treated
  9. Airy –  giving an impression of being unconcerned or not serious
  10. Ambivalent – having mixed feelings; uncertain; in a dilemma; undecided
  11. Amused – pleasantly; entertain or divert in an enjoyable or cheerful manner
  12. Angry – incensed or enraged; threatening or menacing
  13. Animated – full of life or excitement; lively; spirited; impassioned; vibrant
  14. Anxious –  typically with a feeling of unease
  15. Apathetic – showing little interest; lacking concern; indifferent; unemotional
  16. Apologetic – full of regret; repentant; remorseful; acknowledging failure
  17. Appreciative – grateful; thankful; showing pleasure; enthusiastic
  18. Ardent – enthusiastic; passionate
  19. Arrogant – pompous; disdainful; overbearing; condescending; vain; scoffing
  20. Assertive – self-confident; strong-willed; authoritative; insistent
  21. Authoritative – commanding and self-confident
  22. Awestruck – amazed, filled with wonder/awe; reverential
  23. Barbed – deliberately hurtful
  24. Barking – utter a command or question abruptly or aggressively
  25. Belligerent – hostile; aggressive; combatant
  26. Benevolent – sympathetic; tolerant; generous; caring; well meaning
  27. Bitter – angry; acrimonious; antagonistic; spiteful; nasty
  28. Blasé – unimpressed or indifferent to something because one has experienced or seen it so often before
  29. Bleak – without hope or encouragement; depressing; dreary
  30. Bombastic – high-sounding but with little meaning; inflated
  31. Booming – loud, deep, and resonant
  32. Bored – to tire or make weary by being dull, repetitious, or uninteresting
  33. Brash – self-assertive in a rude, noisy, or overbearing way
  34. Braying – speak or laugh loudly and harshly
  35. Breathy – producing or causing an audible sound of breathing, often related to physical exertion or strong feelings
  36. Breezy – appearing relaxed, informal, and cheerily brisk
  37. Brittle – lacking warmth, sensitivity, or compassion; aloof
  38. Bubbly – full of cheerful high spirits
  39. Burbling – speak in an unintelligible or silly way, typically at unnecessary length
  40. Callous – cruel disregard; unfeeling; uncaring; indifferent; ruthless
  41. Candid – truthful, straightforward; honest; unreserved
  42. Caustic – making biting, corrosive comments; critical
  43. Cautionary – gives warning; raises awareness; reminding
  44. Celebratory – praising; pay tribute to; glorify; honour
  45. Chatty – informal; lively; conversational; familiar
  46. Cheery – happy and optimistic
  47. Childish – silly and immature
  48. Chirping – say something in a lively and cheerful way
  49. Clipped – speech that is fast, that uses short sounds and few words, and that is often unfriendly or rude
  50. Cloying – disgust or sicken (someone) with an excess of sweetness, richness, or sentiment
  51. Coarse – rude, crude, or vulgar
  52. Colloquial – familiar; everyday language; informal; colloquial; casual
  53. Comic – humorous; witty; entertaining; diverting
  54. Compassionate – sympathetic; empathetic; warm-hearted; tolerant; kind
  55. Complex – having many varying characteristics; complicated
  56. Compliant – agree or obey rules; acquiescent; flexible; submissive
  57. Concerned – worried; anxious; apprehensive
  58. Conciliatory – intended to placate or pacify; appeasing
  59. Condescending – stooping to the level of one’s inferiors; patronising
  60. Confused – unable to think clearly; bewildered; vague
  61. Contemptuous – showing contempt; scornful; insolent; mocking
  62. Crisp – briskly decisive and matter-of-fact, without hesitation or unnecessary detail
  63. Critical – finding fault; disapproving; scathing; criticizing
  64. Croaking – a characteristic deep hoarse sound
  65. Cruel – causing pain and suffering; unkind; spiteful; severe
  66. Curious – wanting to find out more; inquisitive; questioning
  67. Curt – rudely brief
  68. Cynical – scornful of motives/virtues of others; mocking; sneering
  69. Defensive – defending a position; shielding; guarding; watchful
  70. Defiant – obstinate; argumentative; defiant; contentious
  71. Demeaning – disrespectful; undignified
  72. Depressing – sad, melancholic; discouraging; pessimistic
  73. Derisive – snide; sarcastic; mocking; dismissive; scornful
  74. Detached – aloof; objective; unfeeling; distant
  75. Dignified – serious; respectful; formal; proper
  76. Diplomatic – tactful; subtle; sensitive; thoughtful
  77. Disapproving – displeased; critical; condemnatory
  78. Disheartening – discouraging; demoralising; undermining; depressing
  79. Disparaging – dismissive; critical; scornful
  80. Direct – straightforward; honest
  81. Disappointed – discouraged; unhappy because something has gone wrong
  82. Discordant – harsh and jarring because of a lack of harmony
  83. Dispassionate – impartial; indifferent; unsentimental; cold; unsympathetic
  84. Dispirited – having lost enthusiasm and hope; disheartened
  85. Distressing – heart-breaking; sad; troubling
  86. Docile – compliant; submissive; deferential; accommodating
  87. Drawling – speak in a slow, lazy way with prolonged vowel sounds
  88. Dulcet – sweet and soothing
  89. Dull – lacking interest or excitement
  90. Earnest – showing deep sincerity or feeling; serious
  91. Egotistical – self-absorbed; selfish; conceited; boastful
  92. Empathetic – understanding; kind; sensitive
  93. Encouraging – optimistic; supportive
  94. Enthusiastic – excited; energetic
  95. Evasive – ambiguous; cryptic; unclear
  96. Excited – emotionally aroused; stirred
  97. Facetious – inappropriate; flippant
  98. Farcical – ludicrous; absurd; mocking; humorous and highly improbable
  99. Feathery – extremely light and soft or delicate
  100. Flippant – superficial; glib; shallow; thoughtless; frivolous
  101. Forceful – powerful; energetic; confident; assertive
  102. Formal – respectful; stilted; factual; following accepted styles/rules
  103. Frank – honest; direct; plain; matter-of-fact
  104. Fretful – expressing distress or irritation
  105. Frustrated – annoyed; discouraged
  106. Gentle – kind; considerate; mild; soft
  107. Ghoulish – delighting in the revolting or the loathsome
  108. Glum – dejected; morose
  109. Goofy – foolish; harmlessly eccentric
  110. Grating – harsh and unpleasant
  111. Gravelly – deep and rough-sounding
  112. Grim – serious; gloomy; depressing; lacking humour;macabre
  113. Growling – low grating voice, typically in a threatening manner
  114. Gruff – rough and low in pitch
  115. Gullible – naive; innocent; ignorant
  116. Guttural – produced in the throat; harsh-sounding
  117. Hard – unfeeling; hard-hearted; unyielding
  118. Harsh – cruel or severe
  119. Hearty – loudly vigorous and cheerful
  120. Hoarse – sounding rough and harsh, typically as the result of a sore throat or of shouting
  121. Honeyed – soothing, soft, and intended to please or flatter
  122. Humble – deferential; modest
  123. Humorous – amusing; entertaining; playful
  124. Husky – sounding low-pitched and slightly hoarse
  125. Hypercritical – unreasonably critical; hair splitting; nitpicking
  126. Impartial – unbiased; neutral; objective
  127. Impassioned – filled with emotion; ardent
  128. Imploring – pleading; begging
  129. Impressionable – trusting; child-like
  130. Inane – silly; foolish; stupid; nonsensical
  131. Incensed – enraged
  132. Incredulous – disbelieving; unconvinced; questioning; suspicious
  133. Indifferent – having no particular interest or sympathy; unconcerned
  134. Indignant – annoyed; angry; dissatisfied
  135. Informative – instructive; factual; educational
  136. Insinuating – suggest or hint in an indirect and unpleasant way
  137. Inspirational – encouraging; reassuring
  138. Intense – earnest; passionate; concentrated; deeply felt
  139. Intimate – familiar; informal; confidential; confessional
  140. Ironic – the opposite of what is meant
  141. Irreverent – lacking respect for things that are generally taken seriously
  142. Jaded – bored; having had too much of the same thing; lack enthusiasm
  143. Joyful – positive; optimistic; cheerful; elated
  144. Jubilant – expressing great happiness and triumph
  145. Judgmental – critical; finding fault; disparaging
  146. Laudatory – praising; recommending
  147. Lifeless – lacking vigor, vitality, or excitement
  148. Light-Hearted – carefree; relaxed; chatty; humorous
  149. Lively – full of life and energy; active and outgoing
  150. Loving – affectionate; showing intense, deep concern
  151. Macabre – gruesome; horrifying; frightening
  152. Malicious – desiring to harm others or to see others suffer; ill-willed; spiteful
  153. Matter-of-fact – unemotional and practical
  154. Mean-Spirited – inconsiderate; unsympathetic
  155. Mellifluous – sweet or musical; pleasant to hear
  156. Melodious – pleasant-sounding
  157. Mocking – scornful; ridiculing; making fun of someone
  158. Monotonous – lacking in variation in tone or pitch
  159. Mourning – grieving; lamenting; woeful
  160. Muffled – not loud because of being obstructed in some way; muted
  161. Naive – innocent; unsophisticated; immature
  162. Narcissistic – self-admiring; selfish; boastful; self-pitying
  163. Nasty – unpleasant; unkind; disagreeable; abusive
  164. Negative – unhappy, pessimistic
  165. Nonchalant – casually calm and relaxed; not displaying anxiety, interest, or enthusiasm
  166. Nostalgic – thinking about the past; wishing for something from the past
  167. Objective – without prejudice; without discrimination; fair; based on fact
  168. Obsequious – overly obedient and/or submissive; fawning; grovelling
  169. Oily – unpleasantly smooth and ingratiating
  170. Optimistic – hopeful; cheerful
  171. Outraged – angered and resentful; furious; extremely angered
  172. Outspoken – frank; candid; spoken without reserv
  173. Pathetic – expressing pity, sympathy, tenderness
  174. Patronizing – condescending; scornful; pompous
  175. Pensive – reflective; introspective; philosophical; contemplative
  176. Persuasive – convincing; eloquent; influential; plausible
  177. Pessimistic – seeing the negative side of things
  178. Philosophical – theoretical; analytical; rational; logical
  179. Piping – high-pitched.
  180. Playful – full of fun and good spirits; humorous; jesting
  181. Pragmatic – realistic; sensible
  182. Pretentious – affected; artificial; grandiose; rhetorical; flashy
  183. Quavering – shake or tremble in speaking, typically through nervousness or emotion
  184. Querulous – complaining in a petulant or whining manner
  185. Rasping – harsh-sounding and unpleasant; grating
  186. Reedy – high and thin in tone
  187. Refined –  elegant; cultured
  188. Regretful – apologetic; remorseful
  189. Resentful – aggrieved; offended; displeased; bitter
  190. Resigned – accepting; unhappy
  191. Restrained – controlled; quiet; unemotional
  192. Reverent – showing deep respect and esteem
  193. Righteous – morally right and just; guiltless; pious; god-fearing
  194. Robust – strong and healthy; vigorous
  195. Saccharine –

    excessively sweet or sentimental

  196. Satirical – making fun to show a weakness; ridiculing; derisive
  197. Sarcastic – scornful; mocking; ridiculing
  198. Scathing – critical; stinging; unsparing; harsh
  199. Scornful – expressing contempt or derision; scathing; dismissive
  200. Scratchy –

    rough; grating

  201. Sensationalist – provocative; inaccurate; distasteful
  202. Sentimental – thinking about feelings, especially when remembering the past
  203. Shrill –

    high-pitched and piercing

  204. Silvery –

    gentle, clear, and melodious

  205. Sincere – honest; truthful; earnest
  206. Skeptical – disbelieving; unconvinced; doubting
  207. Smarmy – 

    excessively or unctuously flattering; ingratiating; servile

  208. Smoky –

    a raspy, coarse and tone of quality that is deeper than usual
  209. Snide –

    derogatory or mocking in an indirect way

  210. Solemn – not funny; in earnest; serious
  211. Somber –

    oppressively solemn or sober in mood; grave

  212. Sonorous –

    imposingly deep and full

  213. Sour – resentment, disappointment, or anger
  214. Steely – coldly determined; hard

  215. Strident –

    loud and harsh; grating

  216. Stony –

    not having or showing feeling or sympathy

  217. Suave –

    charming, confident, and elegant
  218. Subjective – prejudiced; biased
  219. Submissive – compliant; passive; accommodating; obedient
  220. Sulking – bad-tempered; grumpy; resentful; sullen
  221. Surly –

    bad-tempered and unfriendly

  222. Sympathetic – compassionate; understanding of how someone feels
  223. Thoughtful – reflective; serious; absorbed
  224. Throaty –

    deep and rasping

  225. Tolerant – open-minded; charitable; patient; sympathetic; lenient
  226. Tragic – disastrous; calamitous
  227. Tremulous –

    shaking or quivering slightly

  228. Unassuming – modest; self-effacing; restrained
  229. Unctuous –

    excessive piousness or moralistic fervor, especially in an affected manner; excessively smooth, suave, or smug

  230. Uneasy – worried; uncomfortable; edgy; nervous
  231. Urgent – insistent; saying something must be done soon
  232. Velvety – soft; smooth
  233. Vindictive – vengeful; spiteful; bitter; unforgiving
  234. Virtuous – lawful; righteous; moral; upstanding
  235. Whimsical – quaint; playful; mischievous; offbeat
  236. Witty – clever; quick-witted; entertaining
  237. Wonder – awe-struck; admiring; fascinating
  238. World-Weary – bored; cynical; tired
  239. Worried – anxious; stressed; fearful
  240. Wretched – miserable; despairing; sorrowful; distressed
Advertisements
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged | Leave a comment

thewinedarksea: a-z fae → s-t Source: thewinedarksea

Gallery | Tagged , | Leave a comment

artykyn:

prideling:

gunvolt:

im going to have a stroke

Instead try…

Person A: You know… the thing
Person B: The “thing”?
Person A: Yeah, the thing with the little-! *mutters under their breath* Como es que se llama esa mierda… THE FISHING ROD

As someone with multiple bilingual friends where English is not the first language, may I present to you a list of actual incidents I have witnessed:

  • Forgot a word in Spanish, while speaking Spanish to me, but remembered it in English. Became weirdly quiet as they seemed to lose their entire sense of identity.
  • Used a literal translation of a Russian idiomatic expression while speaking English. He actually does this quite regularly, because he somehow genuinely forgets which idioms belong to which language. It usually takes a minute of everyone staring at him in confused silence before he says “….Ah….. that must be a Russian one then….”
  • Had to count backwards for something. Could not count backwards in English. Counted backwards in French under her breath until she got to the number she needed, and then translated it into English.
  • Meant to inform her (French) parents that bread in America is baked with a lot of preservatives. Her brain was still halfway in English Mode so she used the word “préservatifes.” Ended up shocking her parents with the knowledge that apparently, bread in America is full of condoms.
  • Defined a slang term for me……. with another slang term. In the same language. Which I do not speak.
  • Was talking to both me and his mother in English when his mother had to revert to Russian to ask him a question about a word. He said “I don’t know” and turned to me and asked “Is there an English equivalent for Нумизматический?” and it took him a solid minute to realize there was no way I would be able to answer that. Meanwhile his mom quietly chuckled behind his back.
  • Said an expression in English but with Spanish grammar, which turned “How stressful!” into “What stressing!”

Bilingual characters are great but if you’re going to use a linguistic blunder, you have to really understand what they actually blunder over. And it’s usually 10x funnier than “Ooops it’s hard to switch back.”

Image | Posted on by | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

sapphicauthor:

THINGS WHICH MAKE WRITERS ANXIOUS:

  • not writing
  • writing
  • people reading their stories
  • people not reading their stories
Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged | Leave a comment

alwaysbringabookwithyou: wlwfiction: 23 September is Bisexual Visibility Day, so WLWFiction is recommending books about bi ladies! * indicates the author is bisexual/pansexual/attracted to multiple genders # indicates author of colour Middle Grade Star-Crossed by Barbara Dee Young Adult Leah on … Continue reading

Gallery | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

meggory84:

glompcat:

It’s a minor pet peeve, but it is everywhere today so errrr…. please keep in mind that “Rest in Peace”/RIP literally comes from a latin phrase and is a very very deeply Christian expression.

When talking about the departed, Jews say “may their memory be a blessing.”

So please, when talking about a dead person who is Jewish, try to keep in mind that RIP is a Christian phrase.

I learned something today, so I’ll pass it on so someone else can learn too

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Book Review: Bone Dance by Emma Bull

I recently read Bone Dance (fantasy 315 pages) by Emma Bull as part of my Asexual Reading list for 2018.

“Sparrow’s my name. Trader. Deal-maker. Hustler, some call me. I work the Night Fair circuit, buying and selling prenuke videos from the World Before. I know how to get a high price, especially on Big Band collectibles. The hottest ticket of all is information on the Horsemen – the mind-control weapons that tilted the balance in the war between the Americas. That’s the prize I’m after. But it seems I’m having trouble controlling my own mind. The Horsemen are coming…”

“Here before me was the familiar exercise of my faith, the Deal. The exchange was only its sacrament, the symbol of larger principles. Nothing Is Free. One way or another, you will pay your debts; better you should arrange the method of payment yourself.” (Page 48).

I’ve been really far behind on my reading goals and also not doing a very good job of posting book reviews when I finish a book. I’ve read a lot more than indicated by the silence here for the last several months. My Asexual Reading list for 2018 had me reading this in September and it’s now November. My concept of time is completely skewed right now so I have no idea when I actually read this, other than it was sometime fairly recently.

This book was unbelievably far ahead of its time. The main protagonist is non-binary before there was common terminology for it. Sparrow is also touch and sex-repulsed, making this individual the first truly asexual character I’ve read without any romantic subplot whatsoever. So while no romantic or sexual subplots existed, Sparrow still found love and acceptance through friendship that turned into family. I found this positive example of interpersonal relationships refreshing.

I also found this book to be incredibly imaginative, as it clearly showed a realistic dystopian future where we would have remnants of our previous world. The rich and powerful sought out nostalgic memories of movies from the past and paid high prices for them on the black market. The rich and powerful also control the use of electricity throughout the city, which is a clear demonstration of how classism crosses all realms, even the dystopian future. The technology use in this book, and the reverence for that technology, interested me and also caused a severe emotional issue during later chapters in the book. But since I don’t want to ruin the book for anyone who hasn’t read it, I’m not going to go into detail about the extra-powerful, heart-wrenching scene that caused me genuine distress.

Page 130 described the world before the future this book with a dialogue between two characters: ‘”Having never lived in a nation,” I said, “I wouldn’t know.” Frances turned her face away, as if I’d slapped her. “Don’t worry, you’re not missing much. A wretched anthill of peaceful, productive, useful life with hardly any invigorating biting and scratching. Where people flossed once a day and mowed the lawn on Sundays.”‘ This description of what’s actually our current world amused me greatly.

Which brings up a very good point about this book. There are two extremely potent and very traumatic events in this book, one of which involves rape. So if that’s a trigger for you, be cautious when reading this book.

The book also understands what it means to be an introvert. There’s a section on page 211 where Sparrow is thinking about what it means to be someone on your own in a crowded world: “I’d never wondered why I could be comfortable here and twitchy in a group of four people. The answer, now that I thought about it, was easy. The streets and stalls of the Night Fair were the opposite of intimacy. To be one of four was to be a focal point; to be one of hundreds was to be anonymous as sand on the shore.” The characters in this book are so absolutely human that the relationships are natural and the interactions real. The later chapters even deal a lot with rebuilding yourself and your life when you’ve lost everything. That whole section hit me really hard as a keen reminder of everything I’ve been through, especially around page 248.

Overall, this book was far more than I was expecting. It hit me in a very powerful and memorable way. I absolutely enjoyed having a non-binary and sex-repulsed person as the main character and having that main character not wind up being a bad person. I would actually rate this book as a low four on my rating scale. I’m glad I purchased it and I will likely read it again in the future.

Bull, Emma. Bone Dance. New York: Tom Doherty Associates, LLC, 1991.

Posted in Book Reviews | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

hmcbook:

“I went to [Tolkien’s] public lectures. They were absolutely appalling. In those days a lecturer could be paid for his entire course even if he lost his audience, provided he turned up for the first lecture. I think that Tolkien made quite a cynical effort to get rid of us so he could go home and finish writing Lord of the Rings.”

“He gave his lectures in a very, very small room and didn’t address us, his audience, at all. In fact he looked the other way, with his face almost squashed up against the blackboard. He spoke in a mutter. His mind was on finishing Lord of the Rings, and he was really musing to himself about the nature of narrative. But I found this so fascinating that I came back week after week, as did one other person. I’ve always wondered what became of him, because he was obviously equally fascinated. And because we stuck there, Tolkien couldn’t go away and write Lord of the Rings! He would say the most marvelous things about the way you take a very basic plot and twitch it here and twitch it there—and it becomes a completely different plot.”

—-Diana Wynne Jones

#I don’t know if I find this more enchanting for a really interesting discussion on worldbuilding and narrative #or the fact that DIANA WYNNE JONES PREVENTED JRR FROM WORKING ON LOTR A WHOLE SEMESTER BECAUSE SHE MADE HIM DO HIS JOB OH MY GOOOOOOOD THAT #IS #HILARIOUS #I LOVE HER SO MUCH

(via basileus)

THIS IS ONE OF MY FAVORITE FACTS ABOUT DIANA

also can you imagine 1) studying at Oxford and 2) studying at Oxford during an era when both JRR Tolkien and CS Lewis were lecturers? 

”And my father died after my first term there. I had to stay at home to see to his funeral, and spent the rest of my time at Oxford in nagging anxiety for my sisters, who were not finding my mother easy to live with. However, C. S. Lewis and J. R. R. Tolkien were both lecturing then, Lewis booming to crowded halls and Tolkien mumbling to me and three others. Looking back, I see both of them had enormous influence on me, but it is hard to say how, except that they must have been equally influential to others too. I later discovered that almost everyone who went on to write children’s books – Penelope Lively, Jill Paton Walsh, to name only two – was at Oxford at the same time as me, but I barely met them and we never at any time discussed fantasy. Oxford was very scornful of fantasy then. Everyone raised eyebrows at Lewis and Tolkien and said hastily, “But they’re excellent scholars as well.“ (source: her autobiography)

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

positive-memes:

Crosspost from me_irl

Image | Posted on by | Tagged | Leave a comment

This gallery contains 2 photos.

referenceforwriters: So You Want To Get Published. Source: referenceforwriters

Gallery | Tagged | Leave a comment